How to Improve the SOP Title

Want to improve the title of your procedures? Let’s look at some ways to make the title more useful to the reader and also reflect the exact nature of the task. The title of your procedure serves several purposes: Identify purpose – distill the purpose of the task into a single sentence, remove clutter, and […]

How to Write the ‘Benefits’ Section in Procedures

Before you start writing your procedure, give some thought to how this will benefit them both from a personal and business level. In other words, you can encourage the reader to use your procedures if you describe the ways their life will be easier if they follow the steps exactly as you have written them. […]

Stage 8 – Signing-off the Procedure

We’ve now completed seven stages in the Procedure writing process. From gathering the requirements, interviewing the Subject Matter Experts, drafting the procedures and getting them reviewed. This takes us up the stage where the documents must be signed off by the Project Stakeholders. While this seems straightforward, there are a few hazards that need to be avoided.

Stage 5 – Analyzing Alternatives and Contingencies to the As Is Business Process

Yesterday we looked at the Information Gathering Phase and described different ways you can get that information from Subject Matter Experts and those in the frontline who use the procedures. In general, Business Analysts gather data through workshops and interviews. Emails work too but I prefer to see the white of their eyes. You can also collect data from reading historical documents which may give more background to the project. These may include Specifications, Requirements and Flowcharts. Gather all these and hold them in a centralized location.

Stage 4 – Sherlock Holmes & The Tale of the Information Gathering Phase

This is the part I like the most about writing procedures. It involves walking around and getting to know those who work with the actual procedure and know how it works ‘warts and all’.

Stage 3 – Establishing SOP Writing Procedures

The third stage of the procedure writing process involves setting up a framework whereby all the different writing activities are formalized.

This means that before the team starts writing the procedures, you can explain to them how the writing process to works and what is expected of each person.

Stage 2 – Organizing the Procedure Writing Team

Yesterday we showed how to get support from the Management team for the Procedure Writing project. We looked at how you need to sell the importance of the quality procedures to the Executive team and how they in turn can pass this message down the line.

Now that we have that in place we can look at the Procedure Writing team. This involves gathering the best writers (or hiring freelance contractors) and then showing them how to write the procedures based on your style guides and SOP templates.

10 Step Plan For Writing Standard Operating Procedures

The aim is to introduce the key concepts involved in: Designing Writing Formatting Testing and Maintainingg Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) These tutorials will look at how you can put together a team of writers who can write procedures to an acceptable level so that your company is better organised, both internally and customer-facing. … Some of the other topics will include: Role and Function of SOPs How to conduct a Needs Assessment How to implement SOPs How to Evaluate SOPs How to create SOP templates How to format SOPs, Process, and Flowcharts How to define a SOP At the end of the course, we’ll share some free sample SOPs and other resources that will help you write your procedures.

How to Stop SOP Templates From Crashing

Is there anything worse than writing Standard Operating Procedures all afternoon and then… Word crashes! If your Microsoft Word files suddenly become huge and start crashing, here’s one way to fix it. I’ve creating some very large SOPs in Microsoft Word and learnt a few ways to control these documents.

29 Ways to Write SOP Procedures Faster

Doing business in China has meant more business analysis, process design, proposal development, case studies and writing standard operating procedures.

As some friends on LinkedIn are also moving into business analysis and SOP writing, I thought I’d add a few tips here. While there is some overlap with technical writing, it does require a different mindset, for example, to understand the process flows and narratives that hold the procedure together.

The Gil Grissom Guide to Microsoft Word 2007

Sandra wants to know where is the Styles menu option in Microsoft Word 2007.

She wants to update her new business plan and add Notes, Messages, Quotes and other pre-formatted styles. The Styles in Microsoft Word 2003 and 2007 seem to be different.

Even Gil Grissom would have a hard time doing this.

ProcessCapture Tool Delivers Documentation & Virtualization

There are already a number of tools which use pictorial imagery to increase this ease of use for the mainstream business user. Examples include the new “Problem Steps Recorder” in Windows 7, “Google Maps” now showing small map sections when giving directions and “Skype” bringing ease of use to the VOIP market. ProcessCapture allows a […]

The Requirements Bill of Materials: A Walkthrough

Image by Ivan Walsh via Flickr Bill Lewis describes a model for application requirements based on a bill-of-materials metamodel. In it he shows how “the imprecise and ambiguous nature of business requirements as a major factor contributing to the high costs and low success rates in system development efforts.”

Procedures Writing Guidelines

Image via Wikipedia A Standard Operating Procedure is a set of instructions having the force of a directive, covering those features of operations that lend themselves to a definite or standardized procedure without loss of effectiveness. Standard Operating Policies and Procedures can be effective catalysts to drive performance improvement and improve organizational results. Most quality […]

Process Design – Tips for Helping Your Team Adapt

Image by Geodog via Flickr So you have decided to adopt a more formal process for getting your projects done, congratulations. It is a good decision that will help you better manage your projects, make your team more efficient and improve your chances of coming in on schedule and on budget.

Acceptable Use Policy Template

Image via Wikipedia This Acceptable Use Policy is intended to support culture of openness, trust and integrity. This policy is designed to protect employees, partners and the clients from illegal or damaging actions by individuals, either knowingly or unknowingly.